Cosplay Society

Tutorial: Moldmaking + use for absolute beginners, Part I

abessinier:

Sup folks~

Since everyone is probably getting tired of my chaotic progress pictures and might not actually understand what the hell I’m even doing, I’ll put them into a “linear timeline” and try to explain a bit. I will keep this very general, so it might be helpful for everyones’ projects and in somewhat bigger steps because I see no need to explain every step you can find in the instructions of the materials you use!

Step 1 - The base

If you want to make an armor, it is most likely designed to fit a piece of your body I know, I’m a genius for telling you this. I figured this sentence out all alone and my mom cried because she was so proud of me. And since time to the convention is short and you are bad at sitting still for ages, you should probably come up with something clever. Something you could built your model onto that is not your body.

One way to create a base to model something onto is therefore to use plaster and make something like this:

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Okay okay, that is not the prettiest plastermold you’ve ever seen but it has vaguely the shape of my arm.

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This one looks better.

But there might also be some shapes that are not based on your body- wellll shit!

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In this case, you can make the base out of other materials- for example cut styrofoam and put something over it to prevent it getting into the plastilin!

Step 2 - The Model

To make a model, you can use pretty much everything but for my current project, I prefer working with a modeling clay called Plastilin.

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I normally start by smoothing out some of the Plastilin over the plaster. To get a really smooth surface, I pour some benzine onto a tissue or piece of cotton and carefully rub it over the plastilin.. (Make sure to wear gloves, have the window opened and not light a cigarette while you do this).

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After this, I add details, by cutting out pieces (with linocutters, a pocketknife, an x-acto knife, a scalpel… etc), make holes and lines with a clay modeling set and always take care to keep the whole thing smooth.

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You can also add details through the use of other materials, such as pearls and craft foam! Just make sure to seal the craft foam, for example with podge or clear varnish.

Next:

Part II

reginaldvonhoobiedoobie:


ATTENTION COSPLAYERSSee this shit? This shit is about to change your life.This packet of stuff is called Instamorph Moldable Plastic. You literally buy a packet of this shit, and you can make any-fucking-thing.
You open it up, and you get little plastic pellets that look like this.
Doesn’t look like much, right?
WRONG.
When put in hot water (140°F, 60°C.), these pellets melt into a kind of putty-like stuff, that you can mold into whatever shape you want.They make the coolest cosplay accessories EVER because they’re plastic - they’re moderately lightweight, they’ll survive being dropped and banged around, and they’re waterproof. I made Nepeta horns and Meenah bracelets for my homestuck cosplays, but it can do a ton of other stuff too.

Also, the whole project takes maybe a half hour - 10 minutes to boil the water, 2 for the pellets to melt in the bowl (it leaves no residue, so you can use a regular mixing bowl and a spoon to pull it out of the water), a few minutes to sculpt and then a few minutes for it to dry into a completely solid, plastic whatever-you’re-making.
AND THE BEST PART OF THIS IS THAT THIS SHIT IS SO CHEAP
YOU’D EXPECT IT TO BE REALLY EXPENSIVE BUT IT’S NOT
I got a container on Amazon.com for $10, but here’s the actual site so you can check it out some more. http://www.instamorph.com/
SERIOUSLY THOUGH DON’T GO TO ALL THE TROUBLE OF FINDING CREATIVE AND EFFECTIVE WAYS TO MIX MATERIALS, THIS IS REALLY GREAT.



Other commenters on this post mentioned that this is also know as friendlyplastic, and also that it would probably be better suited as a finishing material on top of something else, rather than making your prop entirely out of it.

reginaldvonhoobiedoobie:

ATTENTION COSPLAYERS

See this shit?
This shit is about to change your life.

This packet of stuff is called Instamorph Moldable Plastic. You literally buy a packet of this shit, and you can make any-fucking-thing.

You open it up, and you get little plastic pellets that look like this.
image

Doesn’t look like much, right?

WRONG.

When put in hot water (140°F, 60°C.), these pellets melt into a kind of putty-like stuff, that you can mold into whatever shape you want.

They make the coolest cosplay accessories EVER because they’re plastic - they’re moderately lightweight, they’ll survive being dropped and banged around, and they’re waterproof. I made Nepeta horns and Meenah bracelets for my homestuck cosplays, but it can do a ton of other stuff too.

image

Also, the whole project takes maybe a half hour - 10 minutes to boil the water, 2 for the pellets to melt in the bowl (it leaves no residue, so you can use a regular mixing bowl and a spoon to pull it out of the water), a few minutes to sculpt and then a few minutes for it to dry into a completely solid, plastic whatever-you’re-making.

AND THE BEST PART OF THIS IS THAT THIS SHIT IS SO CHEAP

YOU’D EXPECT IT TO BE REALLY EXPENSIVE BUT IT’S NOT

I got a container on Amazon.com for $10, but here’s the actual site so you can check it out some more. http://www.instamorph.com/

SERIOUSLY THOUGH DON’T GO TO ALL THE TROUBLE OF FINDING CREATIVE AND EFFECTIVE WAYS TO MIX MATERIALS, THIS IS REALLY GREAT.

Other commenters on this post mentioned that this is also know as friendlyplastic, and also that it would probably be better suited as a finishing material on top of something else, rather than making your prop entirely out of it.

(Source: ridiculame)

dangerous-ladies:

Look: these boots are very, very simple. Actually sewing them together is no problem once you’ve got it drafted. 

It is, essentially, a sock. A sock with a fancy cuff, with a sole glued to the bottom. It is also zipper-free. You are going to make a sock that fits over a shoe, and you are going to use a knife to peel off the edges of the sole, tuck the fabric under, and then glue the soles back in place so you have a nice, clean edge.

You will need:

  • Spandex fabric in whatever color you need.
  • Extra spandex fabric with the same amount of stretch for drafting your pattern.
  • Pattern paper.
  • A pair of ballet flats (or whatever shoe type you need.) Make sure you get the right “shape”; Supergirl’s boots, for example, have a pointed toe, and look out for sole color; we usually just go with black because anything else will get dirty/paint will chip. You also want to find one with an easily removed sole; as a general rule, the cheaper the shoe, the easier time you’ll have with it. We usually spend about $5 tops on our flats, haha. If you’re trying to do heels, be very, very cautious; if you damage the structural integrity of the shoe, you might be in some trouble when you need to walk on them. You also want to make sure they are as basic as possible; remove any bows and whatever possible.
  • An exacto knife.
  • Hot glue
  • Usual sewing implements; pins, scissors, rulers, whatever. 

You can draft it yourself easily: take your scrap fabric and wrap it around your leg as I’ve pictured above in the pink, and pin it along the back. You want to make it snug, but not so snug that you can’t get your foot out of it either. POINT YOUR TOE WHILE YOU DO THIS. Additionally, wear the shoe while you pin it around your foot; it’ll need to fit over the shoe in the end anyway. Don’t worry about the bottom of your foot; it’s easier if you make the curve under your heel snug, and the front of your toes, but you’re not going to be closing off the bottom.

When you have it pinned neatly and evenly, trim the edges down. Leave enough excess for seam allowance along the back, and enough for tucking on the bottom. (Tucking into the sole, that is.) Take it off your foot and you should have some weird shape (like a mirrored version of the pattern I have pictured above.)

Now: if you trace that onto pattern paper and smooth out any raggedness you may have made in cutting, you have your basic pattern. Then all you have to do is alter the top of the pattern: a /\ point for Wonder Woman, a V for Supergirl, etc. Because we’re making Supergirl, here, you’ll want it to be in two pieces, as shown in the pattern above. Wherever you cut to change the design, be sure that you add seam allowance (as you can see on our bottom pattern.) Also make sure that the top edge of your sock is snug enough to your calf that you won’t have to constantly bend to fix them.

I’ve taken pictures of my and Christine’s patterns. Obviously, if you don’t want a seam down the front, you need to cut the fabric on a fold. You will need four of the top cuff and two of the “sock”; the top cuff is two-layered so it’s got a clean top!

Sew all the cuffs: in the last picture, that’s what they should look like. First, sew them all at the back seam. Then layer them together to sew the top seam, so that when you fold them right-side out, you have finished cuffs as pictured. Topstitch whatever you want.

Sew the sock’s back seam.

Sew the cuff to the sock. Be very careful about the corners, so that they are sharp. Again, topstitch whatever works.

Use the exacto-knife to separate the shoe from the sole. Don’t take the whole sole off — you don’t want to pop it out of alignment, or compromise TOO much of the shoe’s integrity. You just need enough opened that you can tuck the bottom edge of your sock into the space between.

Once your whole sock is finished, it’s time for the crazy part: put it on, with your shoe. Then, with the help of a friend or with the acknowledgement that your spine will hurt trying to do it to yourself, start putting the bottom edge of the sock under the edge of the sole, and gluing in place. We have found hot glue works best because it hardens/sets fast: anything else and you may be stuck sitting there wearing your shoes for HOURS trying not to ruin your work.

Now you have boots.

Go kick some supervillain ass, girl.

baconsavingcosplay:

Circle Skirt Tutorial by Kapalaka
Circle skirts are one of the handiest things you can learn to make for cosplay.  As far as simple-to-make skirts go, there are two types: circle skirts and rectangle skirts.  A rectangle skirts is where you cut out a large rectangle, and gather or pleat all of the excess material until it will fit your waist, giving you a nice full skirt (we explained it in a bit more detail on this over here).
Circle skirts, on the other hand, give you a lot of nice fullness, but with minimal bulk at the waist.  For example, my Babs Bunny skirt:

It might not seem like it, but there are a ton of different things you can do with circle skirts.  Long circle skirts (as outlined in the tutorial) are perfect for ball gowns.  If you need less fullness, you can make a half circle skirt or a 3/4 circle skirt (just use a half circle or 3/4 of a circle, instead of the full circle).  If you need more fullness, make several circle skirts (make sure you adjust the waist measurement accordingly, i.e. for 2 circle skirts, use half your waist measurement on both of them), and sew them all together.  Here’s an example of that technique (with gathers and horse hair braid in the hem.  Tutorial for how she made it here)

You can add pleats or scallops in the hem, layer a whole bunch on top of each other, or whatever else you want to do:

I’ve even known some people to make capes and cloaks and the like using a circle skirt as the basis of their pattern.  So go forth!  Go forth and use circles!

baconsavingcosplay:

Circle Skirt Tutorial by Kapalaka

Circle skirts are one of the handiest things you can learn to make for cosplay.  As far as simple-to-make skirts go, there are two types: circle skirts and rectangle skirts.  A rectangle skirts is where you cut out a large rectangle, and gather or pleat all of the excess material until it will fit your waist, giving you a nice full skirt (we explained it in a bit more detail on this over here).

Circle skirts, on the other hand, give you a lot of nice fullness, but with minimal bulk at the waist.  For example, my Babs Bunny skirt:

image

It might not seem like it, but there are a ton of different things you can do with circle skirts.  Long circle skirts (as outlined in the tutorial) are perfect for ball gowns.  If you need less fullness, you can make a half circle skirt or a 3/4 circle skirt (just use a half circle or 3/4 of a circle, instead of the full circle).  If you need more fullness, make several circle skirts (make sure you adjust the waist measurement accordingly, i.e. for 2 circle skirts, use half your waist measurement on both of them), and sew them all together.  Here’s an example of that technique (with gathers and horse hair braid in the hem.  Tutorial for how she made it here)

image

You can add pleats or scallops in the hem, layer a whole bunch on top of each other, or whatever else you want to do:

image

I’ve even known some people to make capes and cloaks and the like using a circle skirt as the basis of their pattern.  So go forth!  Go forth and use circles!

turnonred:

Okay that took forever, I’m sorry. Here’s the tutorial on how I made my Journey costume! I’ve included a photoset of the tutorial, and below are the links that will take you to the pattern PDFs (the first is a 24 x 36 file, so happy print tiling!). For Illustrator-savvy folks, you can also dive into the pattern files and manipulate them yourselves.

Side note: I am not a professional seamstress/fashion designer, so I’m sorry if there’s inaccuracies or errors or dubious advice, it’s more of a step by step of how I did it with helpful patterns!

Any questions, use the Ask box, also! I’m happy to offer any help or advice! And I’m sorry, but I do not take commissions!

Pattern File
Glyph File

If you have problems downloading, let me know! Don’t abuse my bandwidth, plz

technicolorpoetry:

Got a wig that’s a bit on the ratty side? Check out my overly-long-winded guide under the cut for help! (Image heavy!)
Read More

technicolorpoetry:

Got a wig that’s a bit on the ratty side? Check out my overly-long-winded guide under the cut for help! (Image heavy!)

Read More

firewolf826:

Sometimes you end up cosplaying a character with a really crazy hairline, and you think “How am I going to make THAT?”

Maybe you’ve already learned about lace-front wigs and how they appear more natural-looking. Maybe you’ve even heard of wig ventilation, which is the method for individually adding hairs into the lace of a lace-front wig. If you’ve gotten that far, you’ve probably noticed you need special tools, called ventilating hooks/needles, and they can be costly and hard to acquire. Fear not! I am here to show you a few methods to ventilate hair with just normal supplies you can find at your craft and sewing store!

That’s right, you can ventilate hair with just a normal sewing needle!!!

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